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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Atlantic Arctic sea ice variations. found in the catalog.

Atlantic Arctic sea ice variations.

Christopher Bryan Sear

Atlantic Arctic sea ice variations.

by Christopher Bryan Sear

  • 68 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by University of East Anglia in Norwich .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of East Anglia, School of Environmental Sciences, 1984.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14505264M

  ‘Historic variations in Arctic Ice’ is a series of articles that attempts to determine the arctic warming events through the Holocene which commenced some years ago. (See Graphic ‘after Dansgaard et al’ below. Part 1 covered the . This study suggests that variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) can drive multidecadal climate variability over the Northern Hemisphere, including rapid Arctic sea ice loss and multidecadal changes in Atlantic tropical storm activity. NAO is related to the strength of the westerly winds in the subpolar North Atlantic.

  The following Arctic Ocean topics are covered in Section S (1) Arctic Oscillation or Northern Annular Mode, (2) Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, (3) variations in Arctic sea ice cover, and (4) variations in Nordic Seas and AW properties, including discussion of long-term trends that might reflect anthropogenically forced climate change.   The amount of Arctic sea ice in September, when it shrinks the most, fell by nearly one third since It is disappearing 50 years faster than scientists predicted, said Michael Mann, a climate.

Variations of winter Arctic sea ice bordering on the North Atlantic are closely related to climate variations in the same region. When winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index is positive. Impact of AMV on Arctic Sea Ice Variability • Winter Arctic sea ice in the Atlantic side declines with an intensified AMV/AMOC • Similar spatial patterns suggest a possible role of the AMOC in the observed sea ice declining Modeled Regression on AMV Observed Trend () Mahajan et al. b.


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Atlantic Arctic sea ice variations by Christopher Bryan Sear Download PDF EPUB FB2

The anomalous exchanges of sea ice, air, and water between the North Atlantic and the Arctic play a large role in explaining ice volume variations. In particular, the anomaly of oceanic heat transport between Iceland and Norway could alone explain a large part of the simulated ice volume by: 8.

Source: Polyakov, I. et al., Greater role for Atlantic inflows on sea-ice loss in the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, Science, / () The changing Arctic. When people talk about climate change, one of the most common and powerful Atlantic Arctic sea ice variations. book invoked is that of a lone polar bear drifting in the Arctic Ocean on a tiny, fragmented piece of : Veronica Tamsitt.

The anomalous exchanges of sea ice, air, and water between the North Atlantic and the Arctic play a large role in explaining ice volume variations. In particular, the anomaly of oceanic heat transport between Iceland and Norway could alone explain a large part of the simulated ice volume by: 8.

[11] The T NA record also closely tracks variations in sea ice extent. Figure 2e shows the mean of four historical sea ice records for the Atlantic‐Arctic region: Newfoundland ice extent [Hill, ], the Storis index [Rosing‐Asvid, ], and two Nordic Seas indexes [Vinje, ].

Averaging is justified for the same reasons given above Cited by: Here, we use the September Arctic sea ice concentration from the Climate Data Record of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration (Peng et al.

; Meier et al. ) provided by the NOAA National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) to compute the September Arctic Ocean sea ice area; the Arctic Ocean is defined following Holland et al.

The aim of this study is to investigate the stationarity of NAO predictability based on Arctic sea ice in the BK Seas. Many studies have explored the influence of sea ice variations on the atmospheric circulation (e.g., Alexander et al., ; Herman & Johnson, ; Murray & Simmonds, ; Petoukhov & Semenov, ).

The Arctic Ocean is currently losing sea ice in all regions during all seasons (Serreze et al. ; Cavalieri and Parkinson ; Stroeve et al. ; Onarheim et al. ).These changes in the Arctic sea ice cover could potentially have both local and remote impacts on the climate system, influencing the surface energy budget (Bhatt et al.

; Lee et al. ), oceanic (Krishfield. The recent Arctic winter sea ice retreat is most pronounced in the Barents Sea. Using available observations of the Atlantic inflow to the Barents Sea and results from a regional ice–ocean model the authors assess and quantify the role of inflowing heat anomalies on sea ice variability.

The anomalous exchanges of sea ice, air, and water between the North Atlantic and the Arctic play a large role in explaining ice volume variations. In particular, the anomaly of oceanic heat transport between Iceland and Norway could alone explain a large part of the simulated ice volume changes. Persistent multidecadal (∼60–90 yr) fluctuations have also been found in multicentury historical Atlantic Arctic sea-ice records, covarying with the AMO (Miles et al., ), including the historical sea-ice edge data set (60–80 yr; Divine and Dick, ).

in the Barents Sea, so the region is central to understanding ocean-sea ice-atmosphere interactions Vinje ().

Recently, many Arctic regions have experienced a sharp decline in sea ice cover, and this is most pronounced in the northern Barents Sea (Screen and Simmonds, ). Variations in sea. Both will affect the flow of Atlantic water into the Arctic, which is important since warmer ocean temperatures lead to more melting and reduced sea ice growth (e.g.

in the Barents Sea: A˚rthun et al ). The response of SIE to fluctuations in the AMO is larger in March than September in all models. More information can be found in the July Geographical Review article cited below, and in a Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) news article called Reconstructing Arctic History: Scientists build a new database to depict Arctic sea ice variations back to CIRES is a partnership of NOAA and CU-Boulder.

Arctic sea ice; internal variability; ocean heat transport; Observations reveal multidecadal variations in Arctic surface air temperature (SAT), and amplified Arctic warming similar to that observed in recent decades also occurred during – (1 ⇓ –3).Both observations and climate modeling results suggest that the reduced Arctic sea ice is crucial.

Sea ice occupies a large part of the world ocean (about 7%) and covers most of the Arctic Ocean (Figure A25), where it averages about three meters in ice undergoes very large seasonal variations in its areal extent in response to changes in solar insolation.

The Arctic and North Atlantic have experienced pronounced changes over the 20th and early 21st centuries, including a rapid loss of Arctic sea ice over the last several decades, prominent multidecadal variability in both ocean temperatures and sea ice, and decadal-scale change in tropical storm activity.

We use suites of coupled climate model simulations to probe some of. This ocean heat transport is responsible for variations in Arctic Ocean temperatures and sea-ice variability, two closely linked variables whose effects have been exemplified in the Barents Sea (Årthun et al., ; Wang et al., ).

The Greenland Sea shows a comparatively smaller SST means and variations. Variations of winter Arctic sea ice bordering on the North Atlantic are closely related to climate variations in the same region.

When winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index is positive (negative) anomaly phase, Icelandic Low is obviously deepened and shifts northwards (southwards). Simultaneously, the Subtropical High over the North Atlantic is also intensified.

The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is a weather phenomenon in the North Atlantic Ocean of fluctuations in the difference of atmospheric pressure at sea level (SLP) between the Icelandic Low and the Azores h fluctuations in the strength of the Icelandic low and the Azores high, it controls the strength and direction of westerly winds and location of storm tracks.

Historic variations in Arctic sea ice is a series that attempts to determine the arctic warming events through the Holocene which commenced some years ago. Part 1 covered the warm period from approx. to This paper – Part 2 – examines the period of warming with a decade long overlap.

The book is based on several decades of research related to sea ice in the Arctic and its variability, sea ice process studies as well as implications of the sea ice variability on human activities.

The chapters provide an extensive overview of the research results related to sea ice in the Arctic at paleo-scales to more resent scales of.1. Introduction [2] The sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean was extraordinarily thin in the mid‐s.

This statement is supported by observations from submarine upward looking sonar data of ice draft [Rothrock et al., ; Wadhams and Davis, ; Tucker et al., ].A number of sea ice and ocean models confirm that we can simulate many broad aspects of this.

1. Introduction [2] Passive microwave satellite observations, available from to present, show declines in Arctic sea ice extent. Downward trends, while present in all months, are largest in September when the ice reaches its annual minimum extent.

While the downward trend in the minimum ice extent has substantial inter‐annual variability, the minimum .